Passenger Ship Lists
                        
Name Date Port Vessel Steamship Line
Callen, Elizabeth Ln 23 October 6, 1915 Port of New York SS Cameronia Anchor Line
Chachardt, Margaritte Ln 25 May 19, 1845 Port of New York SS Iowa  
Duffy, Bridget Ln 7 December 7,1929 Port of New York SS Letitia Anchor Donaldson Line
Duffy, Bridget Ln 4  August 28,1935 Port of New York SS Caledonia Anchor Line
Duffy, John Ln 18 March 6, 1929 Port of New York SS Cameronia Anchor Line
Duffy,John Ln 10 September 25, 1933 Port of New York SS Caledonia Anchor Line
Duffy, Michael Ln 20 April 17,1911 Port of New York RMS Laurentic White Star Line
Duffy, Terence Ln 22  October 20, 1913 Port of New York SS California Anchor Line
Jeffers, Joseph Ln 1  May 14, 1847 Port of Boston Elizabeth None
Jeffers, Margaret Ln 25 October 11, 1845 Port of Boston Russell Glover None
Lyons, Bridget Ln 15  August 28,1927 Port of Boston SS Celtic White Star Line
Lyons, John & Family Lns 11 - 17  January 1, 1928 Port of Boston SS Laconia Cunard Line
Lyons, Margaret Mary Ln 12  September 17, 1927 Port of New York SS Berengaria Cunard Line
Mallon, Arthur Ln 5  September 24, 1927 Port of New York SS Caledonia Anchor Line
Mallon, Charles Ln 30 March 25, 1923 Port of New York TSS Tuscania Anchor Line
Mallon, James Ln 6  October 1, 1923 Port of Boston TSS Tuscania Anchor Line
Mallon, Rose Ln 10  May 28, 1927 Port of New York SS Berengaria Cunard Line
Mallon, Rose Ln 23  September 14, 1932 Port of New York SS Scythia Cunard Line
Mallon, Rose Ln 150 October 16, 1953 Port of New York SS Ryndam Holland America Line
McCann John Ln 12 May 19, 1913 Port of New York SS Columbia Anchor Line
McCann Mary Ln 29 September 14, 1913 Port of New York SS Cameronia Anchor Line
Mulcahy, Margaret Ln 175  September 28, 1886 Port of Boston SS Austrian Allan Line
Mulcahy, Patrick Ln 7  July 17, 1896 Port of Boston SS Cephalonia Cunard Line
O'Donnell, Margaret Ln 46 May 10, 1896 Port of Boston SS Catalonia Cunard Line
O'Sullivan, William F August 14, 1927 Port of Boston SS Samaria Cunard Line
O'Sullivan, William F & Family Pg 1 Ln 16 - 18 November 28, 1931 Port of New York SS Laconia Cunard Line
Reynolds Annie Ln 7 April 6, 1925 Port of New York SS Celtic White Star Line
Sullivan, Charles Ln 176  September 28, 1886 Port of Boston SS Austrian Allan Line
Sullivan, Charles Pg Ln 30 February 18, 1908 Port of Boston RMS Saxonia Cunard Line
Sullivan, Christopher April 27, 1885 Port of Boston SS Bothnia Cunard Line
Sullivan, Margaret Ln 2  July 21, 1902 Port of Philadelphia SS Rhynland American Line
Sullivan, Margaret Ln 22 March 12, 1908 Port of New York SS Lusitania Cunard Line
Sullivan, William P Ln 26 February 18, 1908 Port of Boston SS Saxonia Cunard Line
Sullivan, William P Ln 25  June 4, 1928 Port of Boston SS Laconia Cunard Line

                             

 

Many thanks to www.norwayheritage.com for providing the data used to document the great passenger ships of the 19th and 20th centuries.

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About Passenger Ship Lists

    For most genealogists especially those new to family history one of the greatest thrills is discovering where and when their ancestor entered their adopted country.  Depending on the year and the port of entry it may not always be an easy task to find your family member.  For those immigrants who arrived in the United States prior to1893, steamship passenger lists had minimal amounts of information making it difficult to verify personal identification.    Sometimes handwriting and the condition of the image of the manifest (as in the case of my grandfather Christopher Sullivan in the picture to the left) may also play a part in accurately deciphering the facts.      Fortunately for genealogists, and for reasons other than preservation of family records, the US Congress proposed in the Immigration Act of 1893 to standardize passenger forms and bring them under Federal jurisdiction.  Captains of steamships entering the United States were required to submit a detailed manifest of all passengers and crew aboard the vessel.   Required information included name, age, marital status, occupation, amount of money in possession, literacy, detailed health status, destination, and family member in point of departure.  With the new requirements of the 1893 act, more detailed information is available than previously and identification becomes less ambiguous.  The image below and to the left of Michael Duffy's arrival in 1911 is a very good example of how these improvements helped to make discovering family history easier.  Note that Michael gives the address of his brother Daniel in Belfast as his nearest relative back home.  This was helpful information when it came to finding Daniel Duffy using Irish Census of 1901 and 1911.  But what happens when you have no clue where or when an ancestor entered the country and what sources are at your disposal that can help can you enhance an individual in you family tree.  Declarations of Intent and Petitions for citizenship are often good ways to determine port of entry into the country.  With the Immigration Act of 1906, new requirements enforced by the Department of Labor were enacted requiring proof of legal entry into the United States.  The Certificate of Arrival is attached to every Declaration and Petition beginning in 1911 the source of which is the original ship's manifest.  Below is a sample image that was attached to John Duffy's application for citizenship in 1932.  Other useful information can be derived from the US Census Returns, such as approximate entry into the country and granting of citizenship.  Keep in mind though, it has been my experience that census information, while enormously helpful, may be inaccurate.  In many cases the census taker received personal information from secondhand sources and therefore data between decades can vary wildly. 

    But what happens when you have no clue where or when an ancestor entered the country and what sources are at your disposal that can help can you enhance an individual in you family tree.  Declarations of Intent and Petitions for citizenship are often good ways to determine port of entry into the country.  With the Immigration Act of 1906, new requirements enforced by the Department of Labor were enacted requiring proof of legal entry into the United States.  The Certificate of Arrival is attached to every Declaration and Petition beginning in 1911 the source of which is the original ship's manifest.  Below is a sample image that was attached to John Duffy's application for citizenship in 1932.  Other useful information can be derived from the US Census Returns, such as approximate entry into the country and granting of citizenship.  Keep in mind though, it has been my experience that census information, while enormously helpful, may be inaccurate.  In many cases the census taker received personal information from secondhand sources and therefore data between decades can vary wildly. 

               

         

                    Michael Duffy 1911                                         John Duffy Certificate of Arrival